Wednesday, 17 August 2011

WEB TECHNOLOGY 2.0


What Is Web 2.0


The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web. Many people concluded that the web was overhyped, when in fact bubbles and consequent shakeouts appear to be a common feature of all technological revolutions. Shakeouts typically mark the point at which an ascendant technology is ready to take its place at center stage. The pretenders are given the bum's rush, the real success stories show their strength, and there begins to be an understanding of what separates one from the other.
The concept of "Web 2.0" began with a conference brainstorming session between O'Reilly and MediaLive International. Dale Dougherty, web pioneer and O'Reilly VP, noted that far from having "crashed", the web was more important than ever, with exciting new applications and sites popping up with surprising regularity. What's more, the companies that had survived the collapse seemed to have some things in common. Could it be that the dot-com collapse marked some kind of turning point for the web, such that a call to action such as "Web 2.0" might make sense? We agreed that it did, and so the Web 2.0 Conference was born.
In the year and a half since, the term "Web 2.0" has clearly taken hold, with more than 9.5 million citations in Google. But there's still a huge amount of disagreement about just what Web 2.0 means, with some people decrying it as a meaningless marketing buzzword, and others accepting it as the new conventional wisdom.
This article is an attempt to clarify just what we mean by Web 2.0.
In our initial brainstorming, we formulated our sense of Web 2.0 by example:
Web 1.0 Web 2.0
DoubleClick-->Google AdSense
Ofoto-->Flickr
Akamai-->BitTorrent
mp3.com-->Napster
Britannica Online-->Wikipedia
personal websites-->blogging
evite-->upcoming.org and EVDB
domain name speculation-->search engine optimization
page views-->cost per click
screen scraping-->web services
publishing-->participation
content management systems-->wikis
directories (taxonomy)-->tagging ("folksonomy")
stickiness-->syndication
The list went on and on. But what was it that made us identify one application or approach as "Web 1.0" and another as "Web 2.0"? (The question is particularly urgent because the Web 2.0 meme has become so widespread that companies are now pasting it on as a marketing buzzword, with no real understanding of just what it means. The question is particularly difficult because many of those buzzword-addicted startups are definitely notWeb 2.0, while some of the applications we identified as Web 2.0, like Napster and BitTorrent, are not even properly web applications!) We began trying to tease out the principles that are demonstrated in one way or another by the success stories of web 1.0 and by the most interesting of the new applications.

Learn more about Web 2.0 at:

Web 2.0 Expo LogoWeb 2.0 expo is a conference and tradeshow for everyone who cares about embracing and extending the opportunities created by Web 2.0 technologies
Co-produced by O'Reilly Media and TechWeb
Web 2.0 Summit LogoWeb 2.0 summint is an exclusive annual event that connects the business leaders, big thinkers, and innovative technologists who are shaping the future of the Web.
Co-produced by O'Reilly Media and TechWeb

1. The Web As Platform

Like many important concepts, Web 2.0 doesn't have a hard boundary, but rather, a gravitational core. You can visualize Web 2.0 as a set of principles and practices that tie together a veritable solar system of sites that demonstrate some or all of those principles, at a varying distance from that core.
Web2MemeMap


Figure 1 shows a "meme map" of Web 2.0 that was developed at a brainstorming session during FOO Camp, a conference at O'Reilly Media. It's very much a work in progress, but shows the many ideas that radiate out from the Web 2.0 core.
For example, at the first Web 2.0 conference, in October 2004, John Battelle and I listed a preliminary set of principles in our opening talk. The first of those principles was "The web as platform." Yet that was also a rallying cry of Web 1.0 darling Netscape, which went down in flames after a heated battle with Microsoft. What's more, two of our initial Web 1.0 exemplars, DoubleClick and Akamai, were both pioneers in treating the web as a platform. People don't often think of it as "web services", but in fact, ad serving was the first widely deployed web service, and the first widely deployed "mashup" (to use another term that has gained currency of late). Every banner ad is served as a seamless cooperation between two websites, delivering an integrated page to a reader on yet another computer. Akamai also treats the network as the platform, and at a deeper level of the stack, building a transparent caching and content delivery network that eases bandwidth congestion.
Nonetheless, these pioneers provided useful contrasts because later entrants have taken their solution to the same problem even further, understanding something deeper about the nature of the new platform. Both DoubleClick and Akamai were Web 2.0 pioneers, yet we can also see how it's possible to realize more of the possibilities by embracing additional
Let's drill down for a moment into each of these three cases, teasing out some of the essential elements of difference.

WEB TECHNOLOGY 3.0


Web 3.0
 
Web 3.0 is a term, which definition is not confirmed or defined so far as several experts have given several meaning, which do not match to each other, but sometimes it is referred to as a Semantic Web. In the context of Semantic Web, Web 3.0 is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, bu t also in a form that can be understood, interpreted and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and integrate information more easily.
Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of first World Wide Web has coined the term Semantic Web. But the concept of Web 3.0, first entered among the public in 2001, when a story appeared in scientific article written by American Coauthored Berners-Lee that described this term as a place where machines can read Web pages as much as humans read them e.g. web connected bathroom mirrors, which can read the news coming through on the web.
Definitions and Roadmap
There are several definitions of the web, but usually Web 3.0 is defined as a term, which has beencoined with different meanings to describe the evolution of web usage and interaction among the several separate paths.
 These include transforming the Web into a database, a move towards making csontent accessible by
multiple non-browser applications, the leveraging of artificial intelligence technologies, the Semantic web, or the Geospatial Web. According to Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia, “Web 3.0 is a third generation of Internet based Web services, which emphasize m a c h i n e - f a c i l i t a t e d understanding of information in
order to provide a more productive and intuitive user experience.”. The third generation of Internet services is collectively consists of semantic web, microformats, natural language search, data-mining, machine learning,
recommendation agents that is known as Artificial Intelligence technologies or Intelligent Web.

According to some experts, “Web 3.0 is characterized and fueled by the successful arriage of artificial intelligence and the web”. While some experts have summarized the efinition defining as “Web 3.0 is the next step in the progression of the tubes that are the Internets”.
According to Nova Spivack, the CEO of Radar Networks, one of the leading voices of this newage Internet, “Web 3.0 is a set of standards that turns the Web into one big database.”
 
Steve, a famous Blog author has defined the term Web 3.0 as, “ Web 3.0 is highly specialized information structures, moderated by a group of personality, validated by the community, and put into context with the inclusion of meta-data through widgets”. While Leiki, the Finland based pioneer company of Semantic Web describes: “Web 3.0 makes the discovery of content streams effortless. It introduces automatic discovery of likeminded users and automatic tagging.”

Sunday, 7 August 2011

SOFTWARE EDITING : PICASA 3.8


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